Posts Tagged ‘revenue’

Digital currencies

Digital currency is electronic money. It’s not available as bills or coins.

Cryptocurrencies are a type of digital currency created using computer algorithms. The most popular cryptocurrency is Bitcoin.

No single organization, such as a central bank, creates digital currencies. Digital currencies are based on a decentralized, peer-to-peer (P2P) network. The “peers” in this network are the people that take part in digital currency transactions, and their computers make up the network.

Using digital currencies

You can use digital currencies to buy goods and services on the Internet and in stores that accept digital currencies. You may also buy and sell digital currency on open exchanges, called digital currency or cryptocurrency exchanges. An open exchange is similar to a stock market. 

To use digital currencies, you need to create a digital currency wallet to store and transfer digital currencies. You can store your wallet yourself or have a wallet provider manage your digital currency for you.

You need a “public key” and a “private key” to use your wallet. Keys are made up of a random sequence of numbers and letters.

Public keys are used to identify your wallet.

Private keys are used to unlock your wallet and access your money. Private keys should be kept secret.

All transactions are recorded to a public ledger or “blockchain” that everyone can see.

How tax rules apply to digital currency

Tax rules apply to digital currency transactions, including those made with cryptocurrencies. Using digital currency does not exempt consumers from Canadian tax obligations.

This means digital currencies are subject to the Income Tax Act.

Buying goods or services using digital currency

Goods purchased using digital currency must be included in the seller’s income for tax purposes. GST/HST also applies on the fair market value of any goods or services you buy using digital currency.

Buying and selling digital currency like a commodity

When you file your taxes you must report any gains or losses from selling or buying digital currencies.

Digital currencies are considered a commodity and are subject to the barter rules of the Income Tax Act. Not reporting income from such transactions is illegal.

Tips for using digital currency

Here are a few tips to help you protect yourself when using digital currency.

Protect your wallet

Take steps to protect your wallet:

  • keep your wallet, and any backups, in a safe place
  • encrypt your wallet using encryption software
  • encrypt any copies you make or online backups
  • set a password to help prevent thieves from withdrawing your funds
  • use a strong password that contains letters, numbers and symbols

Know the merchant’s refund, return and dispute policies

Before you make a purchase, find out:

  • what the exchange rate will be
  • if refunds are available
  • if refunds will be processed in digital currency, Canadian dollars or store credit
  • how to contact someone if there’s a problem

Wait for multiple confirmations before completing a transaction

It can take 10 minutes or more for a digital currency transaction to be confirmed. Confirmation happens when users on the network verify the transaction. During that time, a transaction could be reversed and you could lose your funds to a dishonest user.

Understand what the actual costs will be

Find out if there are any mark-ups or other fees. Find out what will happen if the rate changes before the exchange is completed.

Think about the future

Consider what will happen if you fall ill or die and can no longer access your wallet.

If no one knows the locations and passwords of your wallets when you are gone, the funds can’t be recovered.

Consider having a backup plan for your peers and family.

FEDS CLARIFY INCOME SPRINKLING PROPOSAL

Advisor.ca http://www.advisor.ca/tax/tax-news/feds-clarify-income-sprinkling-proposal

The federal government provided revised income sprinkling measures, offering clarity about how its controversial changes to the Income Tax Act will be implemented.

Specifically, the feds provided bright-line tests for determining whether family members are significantly involved in a family business, and thus are excluded from potentially being taxed at the highest marginal tax rate (known as the tax on split income, or TOSI).

A key requirement is “regular, continuous and substantial” contribution to the business, says Walsh. Family members who fall into these categories won’t be subject to TOSI:

Family members who fall into these categories won’t be subject to TOSI:

  • The business owner’s spouse, provided the owner meaningfully contributed to the business and is aged 65 or over. This aligns with current pension income splitting rules.
  • Adults aged 18 or over who have made a regular, substantial labour contribution – generally an average of at least 20 hours per week – to the business during the year, or during any five previous years. The measure recognizes that post-secondary students may step back from the business during the school year. Hours will be prorated for seasonal businesses.
  • Adults aged 25 or over who own 10% or more of a corporation that earns less than 90% of its income from services, and isn’t a professional corporation. This is consistent with current tax rules concerning capital, and recognizes that some service-based or professional-based businesses often don’t require significant capital to do business. (Service- or professional-based businesses must pass the labour test, above). Business owners have until Dec. 31, 2018, to adjust to this exclusion.
  • People who receive capital gains from qualified small business corporation shares and qualified farm or fishing property,if they wouldn’t be subject to the highest marginal tax rate on the gains under existing rules. This is consistent with the feds’ withdrawal in October of the lifetime capital gains exemption measures.

Family members aged 25 or older who don’t meet any of these exclusions would be subject to a reasonableness test to determine how much income, if any, would be subject to the highest marginal tax rate.

In certain cases, adults aged 18 to 24 who have contributed to a family business with their own capital will be able to use the reasonableness test on the related income.

In a conference call, a spokesperson for Finance Minister Bill Morneau said CRA audits will require proof when it comes to claiming an exemption for a family member.

CRA Project – Third-Party Information Request to disclose Canadian Square sellers

CRA requested Square (service that allows you to accept  payments, using a reader that plugs into your iPod touch, iPhone, or iPad) to disclose information about Canadian Square sellers who processed greater than CAD$20,000 on Square during any of the calendar years 2012, 2013, 2014 or 2015; or during the period of January 1, 2016 to April 30, 2016.

Square will share with the CRA the following information associated with the Square account:

 The name(s) and address(es) associated with the seller’s Square account
The associated financial institution(s) name, transit number and account number
The number of Square Readers and Stands linked to the account
The total monthly aggregate of transactional information between the seller and their customers
The number of employee permissions granted through employee / location management functionality
Square encourages affected sellers to verify their tax statements with the amounts indicated on their Square Dashboard to ensure they have accurately reported their commerce activities.

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Padgett Business Services

1511 10 Street SW Calgary, AB T2R 1E8
Phone: (403) 220-1570

Email: Padgett Calgary

Daniela H. Barber Professional Corporation

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