Posts Tagged ‘personal income’

ESSENTIAL TAX NUMBERS: UPDATED FOR 2018

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WORKING CLIENTS

Maximum RRSP contribution: The maximum contribution for 2017 is $26,010; for 2018, $26,230.

TFSA limit: The annual limit for 2017 is $5,500, for a total of $52,000 in room available in 2017 for someone who has never contributed and has been eligible for the TFSA since its introduction in 2009. In 2018, the annual limit is $5,500, for a total of $57,500 for someone who has been eligible since 2009. The annual TFSA limit will be indexed to inflation in future years.

Maximum pensionable earnings: For 2017, the maximum pensionable earnings is $55,300 ($55,900 in 2018), and the basic exemption amount is $3,500 for 2017 and 2018.

Maximum EI insurable earnings: The maximum annual insurance earnings (federal) for 2017 is $51,300; for 2018, $51,700.

Lifetime capital gains exemption: The lifetime capital gains exemption is $835,716 for 2017 and $848,252 in 2018.

Low-interest loans: The current family loan rate is 1%.

Home buyers’ amount: Did your buy a home? You may be able to claim up to $5,000 of the purchase cost, and get a non-refundable tax credit of up to $750.

Medical expenses threshold: For the 2017 tax year, the maximum is 3% of net income or $2,268, whichever is less. For 2018, the max is 3% or $2,302, whichever is less.

Donation tax credits: After March 20, 2013, the first-time donor super credit is 25% for up to $1,000 in donations, for one tax year between 2013 and 2017.

Basic personal amount: For 2017, it’s $11,635, line 300. For 2018, it’s $11,809.

OLDER CLIENTS

Age amount: You can claim this amount if they were 65 years of age or older on December 31 of the taxation year and have income less than $84,597 in 2017 (the 2018 threshold is not yet available). The maximum amount they can claim in 2017 is $7,225, and in 2018 is $7,333.

Pension income amount: You may be able to claim up to $2,000 if they reported eligible pension, superannuation or annuity payments.

OAS recovery threshold: If your net world income exceeds $74,788 for 2017 and $75,910 for 2018, you may have to repay part of or the entire OAS pension.

CLIENTS WITH CHILDREN

Family caregiver amount: If you have a dependant who’s physically or mentally impaired, you may be able to claim up to an additional $2,121 in calculating certain non-refundable tax credits.

Disability amount: The amount for 2017 is $8,113 (non-refundable credit; $8,235 in 2018), with a supplement up to $4,733 for those under 18 (the amount is reduced if child care expenses are claimed; $4,804 in 2018). Canadians claiming the disability tax credit (DTC) can file their T1 return online regardless of whether or not their Form T2201, Disability Tax Credit Certificate has been submitted to CRA for that tax year.

Child disability benefit: The child disability benefit is a tax-free benefit of up to $2,730 (for the period of July 2016 to June 2018) for families who care for a child under age 18 with a severe and prolonged impairment in physical or mental functions.

Canada Child Benefit: This non-taxable benefit is effective as of July 1, 2016. The maximum CCB benefit is $6,400 per child under age six and up to $5,400 per child aged six through 17. In the 2017 Fall Economic Update, the government pledged to index the benefit beginning in 2018.

Universal child care benefit (UCCB): This benefit was replaced with the Canada Child Benefit as of July 1, 2016. However, Canadian residents can still apply for previous years if they meet certain conditions, including living with the child and being primarily responsible for the child’s care and upbringing.

Child care expense deduction limits: As of 2017, the maximum amounts that can be claimed are $8,000 for children under age seven, $5,000 for children aged seven through 16, and $11,000 for children who are eligible for the disability tax credit.

Children’s fitness tax credit: This credit has been phased out, and is gone as of 2017.

Children’s arts tax credit: This credit has been phased out, and is gone as of 2017.

Originally published on Advisor.ca

1/26/2018 Essential tax numbers: updated for 2018 | Advisor.ca

 

Wills and the Executor

A will specifies your instructions as to how your assets will be distributed on your death. In the will, you name an executor to act as your personal representative and to deal with all the tax, investment, administrative, and other duties involved in distributing and overseeing your assets as per your instructions.

Some people feel honored to be named as the executor, in that it suggests respect and trust in their abilities. However, most people fail to realize how much responsibility is required, the amount of time and effort that the appointment often.

Here are some of the responsibilities of an executor:

Locate the will of the deceased. Determine that the will is the last will of the deceased.

  • Locate the will of the deceased. Determine that the will is the last will of the deceased.
  • Make the funeral arrangements if necessary. Obtain the death certificate.exe
  • Take control of the assets. Arrange security and insurance if required. Have the assets valued for the date of death.
  • Manage the assets for the estate as the trustee.
  • Dispose of perishable assets.
  • Contact financial institutions to change the name on the accounts to “the estate of”,
  • Open a bank account for the estate.
  • Arrange the probate of the will if applicable.
  • Assess the income tax situation and file any required returns.
  • Pay the bills of the deceased and the estate.
  • Make provision for the immediate needs of the spouse and any dependents.
  • Set aside reserve funds for the payment of estimated debts, taxes, probate fees, and compensation for the executor.
  • Prepare an interim distribution to the beneficiaries if available.

Conflicts often arise between the executors and the heirs. The beneficiaries may be suspicious of the executor because he or she does not have enough knowledge or skills, is insensitive, is too hasty, shows favoritism, etc. Anyone who is appointed as an executor should be aware that these are common situations during emotional times.

An executor requires many skills. One of the most important is the ability to know when outside expertise is required. An executor frequently hires a lawyer, accountant or trust company for assistance. Sometimes, appointing an independent outside party, such as a trust company as the executor may be the best choice, especially when a family conflict can be expected, although it can be costly

“Soft” Loans for Your Children

Parents quite often make loans to their adult children to help them purchase a car, a home, or for other reasons. A loan is different from a gift. The parent can charge interest so that the loan will earn some investment income. The loan can be set up for blended payments of principal and interest or to pay interest only. There is no requirement for the parent to charge interest.

For a long term loan used to purchase a house, for example, it is quite possible that the loan will not be repaid during the parent’s lifetime. The parent could provide in her or his will that any remaining balance of the loan will be forgiven or instead become part of the child’s inheritance. Such an arrangement does not cause any adverse tax consequences because the “debt forgiveness” rules in the Income Tax Act do not apply to the settlement of loans by inheritance or bequest.

Giving your child this type of “soft” loan is similar to giving them a part of their inheritance early, during your lifetime.

Here’s why the CRA wants to know what’s going on in your bedroom

The state of your marriage or your common-law status is the government’s business as well because of the tax advantages you might get from being married or, conversely, the deductions you might be able to keep by saying you’re still single.

Expanding income splitting for families, something seniors have been able to do with pensions since 2007, could bring the government into your bedroom like never before.

It’s not like the Canada Revenue Agency and the courts haven’t been there previously. Case law on the subject goes back as far as 1980, with one particular court decision often cited because it outlines key criteria for defining what constitutes a common-law or marital relationship.

As judges today wade through the murky waters of whether a couple are truly in a common-law relationship, they are guided by a 1980 court decision.

In a District Court hearing in Thunder Bay, Judge Stanley R. Kurisko set out seven factors that may indicate a couple is in a common-law relationship. His guidance was eventually endorsed by the Supreme Court of Canada.

SHELTER

Did the parties live under the same roof?

What were the sleeping arrangements?

Did anyone else occupy or share the available accommodation?

SEXUAL AND PERSONAL BEHAVIOUR

Did the parties have sexual relations? If not, why not?

Did they maintain an attitude of fidelity to each other?

What were their feelings toward each other?

Did they communicate on a personal level?

Did they eat their meals together?

What, if anything, did they do to assist each other with problems or during illness?

Did they buy gifts for each other on special occasions?

SERVICES

What was the conduct and habit of the parties in relation to:

Preparation of meals,

Washing and mending clothes,

Shopping,

Household maintenance,

Any other domestic services?

SOCIAL

Did they participate together or separately in neighbourhood and community activities?

What was the relationship and conduct of each of them towards members of their respective families and how did such families behave towards the parties?

SOCIETAL

What was the attitude and conduct of the community towards each of them and as a couple?

SUPPORT (ECONOMIC)

What were the financial arrangements between the parties regarding the provision of or contribution towards the necessities of life (food, clothing, shelter, recreation, etc.)?

What were the arrangements concerning the acquisition and ownership of property?

Was there any special financial arrangement between them which both agreed would be determinant of their overall relationship?

CHILDREN

What was the attitude and conduct of the parties concerning children?

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Principle Residence Exemption

Did you sell your house in 2017?

Commencing with sales in the 2016 tax year, you must report basic information, such as the date of acquisition, the proceeds of disposition (the sale), and the address, on your income tax and benefit return when you sell your home to claim the full principal residence exemption.

You do not have to pay any tax on the capital gain when you sell your home provided it was your principal residence for all the years that you owned it and you did not use any part of it to earn income.

A property may qualify as your principal residence for any year that you or certain family members lived in the house, if none of you designated another property as a principal residence for that year.

File a tax return and claim the principal residence exemption for the capital gains.

Nurse practitioners can now certify applications for the disability tax credit

Nurse practitioners can now certify applications for the disability tax credit

Nurse practitioners can now fill out and sign Form T2201, Disability Tax Credit Certificate making the application process  for the disability tax credit (DTC) easier and more accessible.

Through Budget 2017, the Government has made a change to recognize nurse practitioners as one of the medical practitioners who can certify Form T2201. With over 4,500 nurse practitioners across Canada who can certify patients for the DTC, this change is going to have a positive impact for Canadians living with a disability.

Individuals who want to apply for the DTC, but live in an area where nurse practitioners are the first point of contact, as for example, in Canada’s North, will benefit from this change.

What is the disability tax credit?

The disability tax credit is a non-refundable tax credit that helps persons with disabilities or their supporting family members reduce the amount of income tax they may have to pay.
Applying for the credit is a three step process:

  1. Fill out Part A of Form T2201, Disability Tax Credit Certificate
  2. Have your nurse practitioner fill out Part B
  3. Send form T2201 to the CRA

Being eligible for the DTC can open the door to other federal, provincial, or territorial programs designed to support those with disabilities or their families. These include the registered disability savings plan, the working income tax benefit disability supplement, and the child disability benefit.

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