Posts Tagged ‘benefits’

What is the Canada caregiver credit?

Do you support a spouse or common-law partner, or a dependant with a physical or mental impairment? The Canada caregiver credit (CCC) is a non-refundable tax credit that may be available to you.

The CCC combines three previous credits: the caregiver credit, the family caregiver credit, and the credit for infirm dependants age 18 or older. If you previously claimed any or all of these credits and your situation remains the same as in 2016, then your 2017 CCC claim will stay about the same as in 2016. In some cases, your claim may increase.

However, the one exception is that the previous caregiver credit for people who support a parent or grandparent, who is 65 years of age or older, living with them, and who does not have a physical or mental impairment, is no longer available.

Just like the former family caregiver credit, the CCC is part of other tax credits. This means you also have to meet the conditions for claiming those other tax credits. See What amount can you claim?

Who can you claim this credit for?

You may be able to claim the CCC if you support your spouse or common-law partner with a physical or mental impairment.

You may also be able to claim the CCC for one or more of the following individuals if they depend on you for support because of a physical or mental impairment:

your or your spouse’s or common-law partner’s child or grandchild

your or your spouse’s or common-law partner’s parent, grandparent, brother, sister, uncle, aunt, niece, or nephew (if resident in Canada at any time in the year)

An individual is considered to depend on you for support if they rely on you to regularly and consistently provide them with some or all of the basic necessities of life, such as food, shelter and clothing.

What amount can you claim?

The amount you can claim depends on your relationship to the person for whom you are claiming the CCC, your circumstances, the person’s net income, and whether other credits are being claimed for that person.

For your spouse or common-law partner, you may be entitled to claim an amount of $2,150 in the calculation of line 303. You could also claim an amount up to a maximum of $6,883 on line 304.

 

For an eligible dependant 18 years of age or older, you may be entitled to claim an amount of $2,150 in the calculation of line 305. You could also claim an amount up to a maximum of $6,883 on line 304. See Note below.

For an eligible dependant under 18 years of age at the end of the year, you may be entitled to claim an amount of $2,150 in the calculation of line 305 or on line 367 for your child. See Note below.

For each of your or your spouse’s or common-law partner’s children under 18 years of age at the end of the year, you may be entitled to claim an amount of $2,150 on line 367. See Note below.

For each other dependant 18 years of age or older, who is not an eligible dependant for whom an amount is claimed on line 305, you may be entitled to claim an amount up to a maximum of $6,883 on line 307.

Note

If you are required to pay child support or have shared custody of the child, additional rules may apply. See lines 305 and 367 for more information.

What documents do you need to support your claim?

When you file your income tax return, do not send any documents. Keep them in case we ask to see them.

The CRA may ask for a signed statement from a medical practitioner showing when the impairment began and what the duration of the impairment is expected to be.

For children under 18 years of age, the statement should also show that the child, because of the impairment in physical or mental functions, is, and will likely continue to be, dependent on others for an indefinite duration. Dependent on others means they need much more assistance for their personal needs and care compared to children of the same age.

You do not need a signed statement from a medical practitioner if the CRA already has an approved Form T2201, Disability Tax Credit Certificate, for a specified period.

What is the Canada caregiver credit?

If you’re supporting a family member with a disability, the extra financial responsibility of being a caregiver can have a big impact on your budget. To help offset some of the cost, the Canada Revenue Agency has introduced the Canada Caregiver Amount. If you qualify, you could be in line for a tax break. Here’s what you need to know about the Canada Caregiver Amount.

Out with the Old

The Canada Caregiver Amount replaces three credits:

The Caregiver Amount,

The Amount for Infirm Dependants (18 & older), and

The Family Caregiver Amount.

The rules for claiming each of these credits were very different from each other. For example, the Caregiver Amount required that the person you were supporting must live with you while the Amount for an Infirm Dependant did not. The Family Caregiver Amount was the only one of the three available for children until 18.

Now, with the Canada Caregiver Credit, figuring out if you qualify for a tax credit is much simpler. There’s only one set of requirements; either you qualify or you don’t.

What’s Changed?

The Canada Caregiver Amount brings three main changes:

  1. The dependant you’re supporting must be “infirm”.

This means that your family member must be dependant upon you due to a physical or mental condition or “infirmity”. In the past, if you lived with a parent or grandparent over the age of 65, you were eligible for the former Caregiver Amount, even if the senior wasn’t “infirm”. That’s’ no longer the case.

  1. The dependant doesn’t have to live with you.

This is good news to all the caregivers whose help allows family members to stay in their own homes. If your disabled sister lives nearby but you assist with day-to-day chores like grocery shopping or paying bills, your help could earn you a tax break.

  1. Partial credit is available if your dependant’s income is too high.

Previously, if your dependant’s income was over $14,000, you may have been excluded from claiming any tax credits. The Canada Caregiver Amount features a more generous income limit ($16,163) for the full credit and partial credit for incomes up to $23,046.

Do I Qualify for the Canada Caregiver Amount?

If you’re caring for a low-income family member with an infirmity, there’s a good chance you qualify. There are two base amounts for the Canada Caregiver Amount – $2,150 and $6,388. How much credit you can claim depends on the dependant’s relationship to you, what other credits you’re claiming for them, and their income level.

If your spouse is infirm, the amount of your Canada Caregiver Amount depends on their income. First, the $2,150 figure is added to the usual spouse amount. If your spouse’s income is zero, you’ll claim the total of the spousal amount and the $2,150. If your spouse’s income is too high to claim the spousal amount, you still may qualify for the Canada Caregiver Amount. A “top-up” calculation is used for higher incomes so if your spouse earns less than $23,046, you will receive partial credit. Similar rules apply if you’re claiming the Eligible Dependant Credit for a child under 18.

If your infirm dependant is a family member other than your spouse or minor child, the full amount of $6,388 may be claimed if your relative’s net income is below $16,163. If your relative’s income is between $16,163 and $23,046, a partial credit can be claimed.

If your minor child is infirm and you are not claiming the Eligible Dependant Credit for them, you’ll claim $2,150 for each qualifying child.

If your parent or grandparent is over 65 but is not infirm, you do not qualify for the Canada Caregiver Amount.

Canada Caregiver Amount FAQs

If I pay support for my infirm dependant, can I claim the Canada Caregiver Amount?

If you are required to pay support for the dependant, you cannot claim the Canada Caregiver Amount.

Can I split the Canada Caregiver Amount with another person?

If more than one person cares for the infirm dependant, the credit can be shared. The maximum amount of $6,883 still applies.

What proof of infirmity is required?

A signed statement from your dependant’s doctor or practitioner may be required by the Canada Revenue Agency. The statement should contain details on the infirmity as well as when the infirmity began and how long it is expected to last. If your dependant already has an approved Form T2201 – Disability Tax Certificate – on file with CRA, no additional paperwork is needed.

By Jennifer Gorman

https://turbotax.intuit.ca/tips/everything-need-know-canada-caregiver-credit-8006

Employer-Paid Disability Programs

If you think that paying for your employees’ disability premiums is always a good thing, think again. If you provide your employees disability insurance as a non-taxable fringe benefit, the periodic payments they receive upon their disability will be, in most cases, FULLY taxable to them!

Payments received due to disability are not taxable if:

→ Your employees paid the premiums on the policy with after-tax funds, OR,

→ You paid the premiums but deducted the amount from their income.

The cost of disability insurance even over a good amount of time – can be far less than the tax due on the income received under the policy. Like all insurance, it all depends on whether you actually collect under the policy. Where the employer contribution is made after 2013, the contribution is a taxable benefit to the extent that the related coverage can be paid to you in a lump sum. However, lump sums received are not taxable.

2018 Federal Budget Highlights

  • a deficit of $19.4 billion for fiscal 2017-2018, and forecasts deficits of $18.1 billion for 2018-2019 and $17.5 billion for fiscal 2019- 2020
  • the new taxation regime for holding passive investments inside a private corporation, originally contemplated in July 2017. Under these proposals, if a corporation and its associated corporations earn more than $50,000 of passive investment income in a year, the amount of income eligible for the small business tax rate would be reduced, such that the business limit would be reduced to zero at $150,000 of investment income.
  • tax-tightening measures
  • does not include any changes to the personal or corporate tax rates, or any enhanced capital cost allowance in response to U.S. tax reform.

https://assets.kpmg.com/content/dam/kpmg/ca/pdf/tnf/2018/ca-2018-federal-budget-highlights.pdf

Dying without a Will

A will is a document that says how you wish property to be divided after your death.

In Alberta, if you die without a will or if you leave property that is not disposed of by will, the Wills and Succession Act determines what will happen to your property.

 If you die leaving children but no spouse, then everything is divided equally among your children. If any of your children died before you, but left children (your grandchildren) who survive you, are entitled to share the portion of your estate which your child would have received if he or she was alive.

If you are married or in an adult interdependent partnership and you have children who are also the children of your surviving spouse or adult interdependent partner, your spouse or adult interdependent partner is entitled to receive your entire estate.

 If you are married or in an adult interdependent partnership and you have children who are not also the children or your surviving spouse or adult interdependent partner, your surviving spouse or adult interdependent partner will be entitled to receive either 50% of your estate or an amount set out in the Act at the same time of your death, whichever amount is greater. Your children are entitled to share the balance of your estate equally. If any of your children died before you, but left children (your grandchildren) who survive you, those grandchildren are entitled to share the portion of your estate which your child would have received if he or she was alive.

If you leave no spouse or children or descendants, your estate goes to your nearest kin, in the following order: to your parents in equal shares, or to your surviving parent; if both of your parents are dead, then to your brothers and sisters in equal shares. The children of deceased brother and sisters inherit their parent’s share. If you have no surviving nieces or nephews, then your estate would be left to your next of kin according to different degrees of blood relationships. For example, your estate would pass first to your grandparents. If your grandparents have died before you, your estate will be divided equally among your surviving aunts and uncles. If you do not have surviving aunts and uncles, your estate will be divided among your cousins. If you do not leave any traceable next of kin, your estate goes to the provincial government and is used for universities to provide funding for scholarships or fields of research.

The Wills and Succession Act does not consider the needs of each particular family and some unfair situations may result.

A surviving parent may go through needless inconvenience when the other parent dies without a will. For example, where part of the deceased’s estate is to go to the children and the children are under 18 years of age; their share may be held in trust for them by the Public Trustee of Alberta.

As a result, a parent or guardian with small children may only be allowed to use that money if he or she applies to the Public Trustee each time she needs money to buy something for the children. The Public Trustee invests the money held in trust, and charges an administrative fee for acting as trustee for the children.

When the surviving spouse is elderly and the children of the deceased are adults who are able to earn a living, it may be the case that the surviving spouse needs the inheritance more than the adult children do. However, without a will, the estate will not necessarily pass entirely to the surviving spouse. This problem could be avoided by making a will which would leave the entire estate to the surviving spouse.

If you do not have any traceable relatives, you probably still wish to decide what happens to your estate when you die. You may prefer to leave your estate to a charitable organization or a friend rather than to the provincial government. You can state your preference in a will. If you leave any portion of your estate to a charitable organization, your estate will receive a tax benefit as a result of the donation.

Alberta has additional legislation that affects what happens to your estate if you die without a will. For example, The Dower Act, which prevents a married person from selling, mortgaging, or willing away the homestead without the spouse’s consent, entitles the surviving spouse to the use of the homestead for the remainder of his or her life, subject to the interests of any mortgagee or other registered creditor. Under the Dower Act, a homestead is the land upon which there is a dwelling house occupied by the owner (that is the deceased spouse, prior to his or her death), as longs as there are no joint owners on title to the land. The surviving spouse is allowed to occupy the dwelling house during his or her lifetime, or can rent the land and receive the income. This is the case regardless of the terms of the will or the provisions of the Wills and Succession Act.

If you die without a will and the share going to your dependent family members under the Wills and Succession Act is not enough for their proper maintenance and support, your dependent family members may apply to the court for more money. The judge, in such cases may make changes as he or she sees fit. According to the Family Maintenance and Support provisions of the Wills and Succession Act, dependent family members include your spouse or adult interdependent partner, children under the age of 18, and children over the age of 18 who are unable to earn a living due to a mental or physical disability. These provisions also apply where a will is made but does not make adequate provision for dependent family members. If you leave a will, you can specifically address the individual needs of your spouse and minor or disabled children. You can also state your reasons for not leaving a larger portion of your estate to certain of your family members. For example, if you and your spouse have signed a pre-nuptial agreement in which you agree to keep your finances separate, you may wish to make reference to that agreement in your will.

In summary, if you die with a will in Alberta, there are laws that determine what happens to your estate. You should make a will if you want to decide what will happen to your estate when you die, rather than have the provincial legislation do it for you.

http://clg.ab.ca/programs-services/dial-a-law/dying-without-a-will/

 

Employment Insurance Benefits for Self-Employed People

Self-employed Canadians are able to voluntarily access Employment Insurance (EI) special benefits. There are five types of EI special benefits:

→ Maternity benefits (15 weeks maximum) available to mothers of a new born child. It covers the periods surrounding birth;

→ Parental / adoptive benefits (35 weeks maximum) available to adoptive, biological or otherwise legally recognized parents while they are caring for a newly adopted or newborn child. It may be taken by either parent or shared between them;

→ Sickness benefits (15 weeks maximum) which may be paid to a person who cannot work because of injury, sickness, or quarantine;

→ Compassionate care benefits (26 weeks maximum), that may be paid to persons who have to be away from work temporarily to provide support or care to a family member who is gravely ill with a significant risk of death. The benefits can be shared between different family members who applied and are eligible to receive them; and

→ Benefits for parents of critically ill children (35 week maximum): available to eligible parents who take leave of work to provide care or support to their critically ill or injured child. Either parent is eligible or the benefits can be shared.

You are eligible to access the EI special benefits if you:

→ Are a self-employed person or you work for a corporation but cannot access EI benefits because you control more than 40% of the corporation’s voting shares; and

→ Are a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada.

Self-employed Canadians are required to voluntary opt into the Program at least one year prior to claiming benefits. Premium payments begin in the tax year in which they enrolled in the EI Program. Register to participate in the EI program through “my service Canada account.”

Self-employed persons can opt out of the EI Program at the end of any tax year, provided they have never claimed any benefits. If a claim for benefits was made they have to continue to contribute to the EI Program on their self- employed earnings for as long as they are self-employed.

Self-employed Canadians that opt into the EI Program will pay the same EI premium as salaried employees (maximum of $858.22 in 2018). She or he will not be required to pay the employer’s portion of the EI premiums.

Here’s why the CRA wants to know what’s going on in your bedroom

The state of your marriage or your common-law status is the government’s business as well because of the tax advantages you might get from being married or, conversely, the deductions you might be able to keep by saying you’re still single.

Expanding income splitting for families, something seniors have been able to do with pensions since 2007, could bring the government into your bedroom like never before.

It’s not like the Canada Revenue Agency and the courts haven’t been there previously. Case law on the subject goes back as far as 1980, with one particular court decision often cited because it outlines key criteria for defining what constitutes a common-law or marital relationship.

As judges today wade through the murky waters of whether a couple are truly in a common-law relationship, they are guided by a 1980 court decision.

In a District Court hearing in Thunder Bay, Judge Stanley R. Kurisko set out seven factors that may indicate a couple is in a common-law relationship. His guidance was eventually endorsed by the Supreme Court of Canada.

SHELTER

Did the parties live under the same roof?

What were the sleeping arrangements?

Did anyone else occupy or share the available accommodation?

SEXUAL AND PERSONAL BEHAVIOUR

Did the parties have sexual relations? If not, why not?

Did they maintain an attitude of fidelity to each other?

What were their feelings toward each other?

Did they communicate on a personal level?

Did they eat their meals together?

What, if anything, did they do to assist each other with problems or during illness?

Did they buy gifts for each other on special occasions?

SERVICES

What was the conduct and habit of the parties in relation to:

Preparation of meals,

Washing and mending clothes,

Shopping,

Household maintenance,

Any other domestic services?

SOCIAL

Did they participate together or separately in neighbourhood and community activities?

What was the relationship and conduct of each of them towards members of their respective families and how did such families behave towards the parties?

SOCIETAL

What was the attitude and conduct of the community towards each of them and as a couple?

SUPPORT (ECONOMIC)

What were the financial arrangements between the parties regarding the provision of or contribution towards the necessities of life (food, clothing, shelter, recreation, etc.)?

What were the arrangements concerning the acquisition and ownership of property?

Was there any special financial arrangement between them which both agreed would be determinant of their overall relationship?

CHILDREN

What was the attitude and conduct of the parties concerning children?

http://business.financialpost.com/personal-finance/taxes/heres-why-the-cra-wants-to-know-whats-going-on-in-your-bedroom

http://business.financialpost.com/author/garrymarr

http://twitter.com/dustywallet

Nurse practitioners can now certify applications for the disability tax credit

Nurse practitioners can now certify applications for the disability tax credit

Nurse practitioners can now fill out and sign Form T2201, Disability Tax Credit Certificate making the application process  for the disability tax credit (DTC) easier and more accessible.

Through Budget 2017, the Government has made a change to recognize nurse practitioners as one of the medical practitioners who can certify Form T2201. With over 4,500 nurse practitioners across Canada who can certify patients for the DTC, this change is going to have a positive impact for Canadians living with a disability.

Individuals who want to apply for the DTC, but live in an area where nurse practitioners are the first point of contact, as for example, in Canada’s North, will benefit from this change.

What is the disability tax credit?

The disability tax credit is a non-refundable tax credit that helps persons with disabilities or their supporting family members reduce the amount of income tax they may have to pay.
Applying for the credit is a three step process:

  1. Fill out Part A of Form T2201, Disability Tax Credit Certificate
  2. Have your nurse practitioner fill out Part B
  3. Send form T2201 to the CRA

Being eligible for the DTC can open the door to other federal, provincial, or territorial programs designed to support those with disabilities or their families. These include the registered disability savings plan, the working income tax benefit disability supplement, and the child disability benefit.

Contact Us

Padgett Business Services

1511 10 Street SW Calgary, AB T2R 1E8
Phone: (403) 220-1570

Email: Padgett Calgary

Subscribe to our SMALL BIZ BUILDER Newsletter.
Yes Please!

Our Rating

Click for the BBB Business Review of this Accountants - Certified Public in Calgary AB

Follow us