Posts Tagged ‘accounting’

CRA Collections and the Small Business Owner

Have you ever wondered how your personal assets would be affected should the CRA send you an advisory or audit for collections? Here are eleven tips that will help safeguard small business owner’s personal asset’s from CRA collections.

Never use your home address as your business address. If you have a business location outside of your house use that location. If CRA collections issues a direction to the sheriff to prepare a report of assets, the sheriff will go to the business address.

If the corporation has debts to the CRA, attempt to make a payment arrangement. A payment period of 6 – 24 months has a better chance of acceptance by CRA collections. You provide post-dated cheques for the payment period.

If a payment arrangement has been made, and the cheques issued to CRA, provide this proof to the sheriff who will include this information in their report of the assets.

Ensure there are sufficient funds in the bank account to cover the amount of the cheques. A bounced cheque forces the CRA collections officer to look for other sources to obtain the money.

Keep all CRA filings and payments up to date during the period of the payment arrangement. This includes GST/HST, payroll taxes, and income taxes, etc.

Apply for interest relief while the corporation is paying off the debt to CRA. If accepted by CRA, the outstanding balance will be decreased.

If you can make an additional large payment while paying the arrangement, this will reduce the interest on the outstanding balance.

Be honest with the CRA collections officer, whether you have nothing (or something) to hide. Do not say anything to cause the collections officer to be concerned.

Similarly, if the CRA collections officer requests information, be sure to provide it. Try to build trust with the collections officer, so that the person may show some discretion.

Be polite to the CRA collections officer. They are just doing their job.

If there is a personality conflict between the CRA collections officer and you, request a meeting with them, their supervisor and you. Attempt to improve the relationship to resolve your tax issues.

 

August 1, 2017/in News /by Chris Hammond

http://www.countbeans.com/how-to-safeguard-the-small-business-owners-personal-assets-from-cra-collections-officers/

Perspective on cash flow

A 26-year financial services veteran’s perspective on cash flow

Posted on: October 19, 2017 | Author: Myron Feser, vice president of sales, ATB Financial

Cash is king. For no one is this more true than for the entrepreneur who’s working to get their new business off the ground. Learning how to manage cash flow is a crucial milestone on the road to success.

Cash flow is the health of your company. Access to working capital will allow you to provide stability during tough times, while having cash available helps your business grow and thrive during prosperous ones. The ability to handle the ups and downs of any economic cycle also shows the bank that your company is well managed!

Of course, like many things involved in entrepreneurship, it isn’t as easy as it sounds. In fact, effectively managing cash flow can be downright overwhelming, especially if you’re just starting out. It’s always a good idea to engage financial experts, like a business accountant, to help you. As your business grows, you may even want to think about bringing in someone to orchestrate your cashflow full-time.

Whether you’re managing your finances on your own or if you’ve brought in an expert, the next step is to understand your business cycle. That means knowing how quickly the goods or services you provide can be turned into cash. For example, if you have a manufacturing business your cycle might look like: Take raw materials -> manufacture product -> sell the product -> turn the receivable into cash.

The shorter the cycle, the better it is for your business as you’ll have more cash on hand. Even shortening your business cycle by one day can have a significant impact on your company’s working capital position.

Again, having working capital is crucial to building a successful business. Most businesses don’t fail because they aren’t profitable. They fail because they run out of cash. Keep an eye on your cash and your business cycle, and your business should thrive!

Myron’s top cash flow tips:

Entrepreneurs often underestimate how much working capital is required to grow their business. Talk to your banker and figure out how much you need.

Finance any capital purchases like capital assets so that you don’t tie up too much of your working capital.

Make sure you understand your finances and cash flow—even if you do bring in outside help. Monitoring your cash flow on a daily or weekly basis is critical.

Develop strategies to make your business cycle as short as possible.

Definitions

Working capital: the money you use for day-to-day operations. Current assets minus current liabilities.

Capital purchases: significant purchases that a company makes as an investment to acquire or improve long-term capital assets.

Capital assets: assets owned by the company, like buildings or equipment.

Business cycle: how fast you turn your inventory, product or service into cash.

FEDS CLARIFY INCOME SPRINKLING PROPOSAL

Advisor.ca http://www.advisor.ca/tax/tax-news/feds-clarify-income-sprinkling-proposal

The federal government provided revised income sprinkling measures, offering clarity about how its controversial changes to the Income Tax Act will be implemented.

Specifically, the feds provided bright-line tests for determining whether family members are significantly involved in a family business, and thus are excluded from potentially being taxed at the highest marginal tax rate (known as the tax on split income, or TOSI).

A key requirement is “regular, continuous and substantial” contribution to the business, says Walsh. Family members who fall into these categories won’t be subject to TOSI:

Family members who fall into these categories won’t be subject to TOSI:

  • The business owner’s spouse, provided the owner meaningfully contributed to the business and is aged 65 or over. This aligns with current pension income splitting rules.
  • Adults aged 18 or over who have made a regular, substantial labour contribution – generally an average of at least 20 hours per week – to the business during the year, or during any five previous years. The measure recognizes that post-secondary students may step back from the business during the school year. Hours will be prorated for seasonal businesses.
  • Adults aged 25 or over who own 10% or more of a corporation that earns less than 90% of its income from services, and isn’t a professional corporation. This is consistent with current tax rules concerning capital, and recognizes that some service-based or professional-based businesses often don’t require significant capital to do business. (Service- or professional-based businesses must pass the labour test, above). Business owners have until Dec. 31, 2018, to adjust to this exclusion.
  • People who receive capital gains from qualified small business corporation shares and qualified farm or fishing property,if they wouldn’t be subject to the highest marginal tax rate on the gains under existing rules. This is consistent with the feds’ withdrawal in October of the lifetime capital gains exemption measures.

Family members aged 25 or older who don’t meet any of these exclusions would be subject to a reasonableness test to determine how much income, if any, would be subject to the highest marginal tax rate.

In certain cases, adults aged 18 to 24 who have contributed to a family business with their own capital will be able to use the reasonableness test on the related income.

In a conference call, a spokesperson for Finance Minister Bill Morneau said CRA audits will require proof when it comes to claiming an exemption for a family member.

Per Diem Meal Allowance

In a recent Technical Interpretation, CRA noted that an employer-provided meal allowance will not be taxable where the following conditions are met:

→ It must be a reasonable amount;

→ The allowance is received to cover expenses while travelling away from the metropolitan area or the municipality where the employer’s establishment is located, at which the employee normally worked or to which the employee normally reported;

→ The travelling is done to perform the duties of an office or employment.

As a general rule, CRA allows an employer to use $17 (including the GST/HST, and PST) per meal as a reasonable over-time meal allowance. The rate is stated in the CRA Guide T4130.

CRA usually considers an allowance to be reasonable if it covers the out-of-pocket expenses incurred by an employee who is travelling for employment purposes.

What to do if the Canada Revenue Agency reviews your tax return

If the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) tells you it’s reviewing one or more of your tax returns, don’t panic! In most cases, it’s simply a routine check.

The first thing you should know is a review is not an audit.  If the CRA tells you that your tax return is being reviewed, it is simply to ensure that the amounts you have claimed are reported accurately. It might also be because some documents are required to support your claim. It’s important to respond promptly to the information request or to call the number shown on the letter as soon as possible since there is a time limit involved.

Why is the CRA reviewing your tax return?

The Canadian tax system is based on self-assessment. You don’t usually need to include your documents when you file your tax return. However, from time to time, the CRA will contact individuals under one of its review programs. This is part of the CRA’s efforts to ensure the integrity of the tax system. Make sure you give the CRA the requested documents as soon as possible so it can do its review quickly and easily.

How long do you have to keep your records?

Keep all your tax documents for at least six years from the date you file your tax return. If you claimed expenses, deductions, or tax credits, make sure you keep all your receipts and related documents in case the CRA asks to see them.

What will happen after your review?

The CRA will let you know the result of your review in writing, either in a letter or on a notice of assessment or reassessment.

 

 

Newcomer to Canada? What you need to know to do your taxes

If you are a newcomer to Canada for all or part of a tax year (January 1 to December 31), you need to do your taxes (file an income tax and benefit return) if you receive or want to receive certain benefits and credits, want to claim a refund, or have to pay tax.

Important facts

You become a resident of Canada for income tax purposes when you establish significant residential and social ties in Canada. Examples include having a home, or a spouse or common-law partner in Canada. You usually establish these ties the date you arrive in Canada.

You should still do your taxes even if you have little or no income to report. By filing an income tax and benefit return, you might be able to get benefits and credits such as the goods and services tax credit and the Canada child benefit. Your spouse or common-law partner also has to do their taxes each year for you to receive benefit and credit payments that you may be eligible to receive.

Remember you need to file on time to make sure there are no interruptions to your Canada child benefit, GST/HST credit, and child disability benefit payment!

 

Claiming Automobile Expenses

One of the more common expenses claimed by taxpayers are automobile expenses (applies to any motor vehicle such as van, bus, pickup truck, station wagon, SUV or other truck). Many individuals use their automobile for work or business and incur personal expenses in doing so.

It is important to note that only expenses of a business nature are eligible as a deduction against their related income. As such, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) has strict requirements in ensuring that only business-related expenses are claimed. As a result, the retention of automobile tax records becomes imperative for every taxpayer that uses an automobile for work or business.

Automobile allowance rates

The automobile allowance rates for 2016 and 2017 are:

  • 54¢ per kilometre for the first 5,000 kilometre driven; and
  • 48¢ per kilometre driven after that.

In the Northwest Territories, Yukon, and Nunavut, there is an additional 4¢ per kilometre allowed for travel.

Gov’t of Canada targeting retail workers with employee discount tax

A spokesperson for Revenue Minister Diane Lebouthillier confirmed that her office is reviewing the proposal, which appears in the latest version of the tax folio from the Canada Revenue Agency.

The proposal is to tax employee discounts as income based on the amount of money saved. Under the proposed change, employee discounts would be counted as income, and the value of that discount would need to be taxed at “equal to the fair market value of the merchandise purchased, less the amount paid by the employee.” Exceptions would only be made on discounts that are afforded to some members of the public at some point during the year.

The latest version of the Canada Revenue Agency’s tax folio advises employers that “when an employee receives a discount on merchandise because of their employment, the value of the discount is generally included in the employee’s income,” with the value of the discount assessed at “equal to the fair market value of the merchandise purchased, less the amount paid by the employee,” unless the discount is “available to the public or a segment of the public, at some point during the year.”

Conservative finance critic Pierre Poilievre issued a statement Monday saying the change means the government plans to tax things like a 10 per cent shoe discount offered to shoe salesmen, a meal discount offered to a waitress or a free gym membership given to a fitness trainer.

Before the change, which some expect to come into effect Jan. 1, employers were advised to tax employee discounts only if the employee was purchasing the merchandise below the employer’s cost.

Not only would the change “target those who can least afford to pay more,” according to Poilievre, but it means local business owners will have the headache of needing to “track all of these discounts.”

Minister of National Revenue Diane Lebouthillier said in a written statement that the CRA’s goal is “to ensure that the agency does not impose additional administrative burdens on businesses.”

With a report from CTV’s Kevin Gallagher

ctvnews.ca/politics

What are the pensionable earnings for CPP in 2014?

CPP Pensionable Earnings Rise for 2014

The maximum pensionable earnings under the Canada Pension Plan (CPP) for 2014 will increase to $52,500 in 2014, which is an increase from $51,100 in 2013, while the basic exemption remains at the current $3,500 level.

 

While employee contribution rates remain unchanged at 4.95% and the self‑employed contribution rate will remain unchanged at 9.9%, maximum contributions will still rise for everyone.

The maximum employer and employee contributions are $2,425.50 each and the maximum self-employed contribution will be $4,851.00. The maximums in 2013 were $2,356.20 and $4,712.40.

What changes come with the revised T1135?

The Revised T1135 – This Could Get Ugly for Taxpayers, Investment Advisors & Accountants

 

The T1135


To provide some symmetry to my return to blogging, I start off where I left off. You may recall that my last blog discussed the revised T1135 Foreign Income Verification Form (“T1135”). In that post I discussed the new reporting requirements, which now includes the following:

  • The name of the specific foreign bank/financial institution holding funds outside Canada
  • For each foreign property identified on the T1135, the maximum funds/cost amount for the property during the year and cost amount at the end of the year (the old form only required the cost amount at the end of the year if at anytime in the year you exceeded the threshold)
  • For each foreign property identified on the T1135, the income and capital gain/loss generated (the old form asked for total income or gains from all foreign property in one lump sum)
  • Specific country where each foreign property is located (the old form had pre-defined groupings based on each continent for all the property on an aggregate basis) 

 

The T3/T5 Exclusion


I concluded my July 2nd post by saying that “There is one important saving grace to these rules. If the income for a foreign property is reported on a T3 or T5, the details do not have to be reported. This will exempt most U.S. or foreign stocks held with Canadian brokerages; but the details for property held outside Canadian institutions will be burdensome”.

While the above statement is essentially correct, the CRA’s administrative position in regard to this exemption may prove problematic. You see, the CRA is saying that even where you hold a foreign stock or bond in an account with a Canadian brokerage firm that issues a T3 or T5 for that account; if that security does not pay income in the form of a dividend or interest and thus is not reported on the T3 or T5, the specific stock or bond will not be excluded and will have to be reported in detail on the T1135. This position was recently confirmed by a CRA representative to one of my tax managers.

 

In addition, it must be noted you will still be required to file the T1135 if the total cost amount of your foreign holdings exceeds $100,000 at anytime during the year, even if dividends or interest is reported on a T3 or T5. See the example discussed in this article by Jamie Golembek, where the CRA representative states you would still need to file the form and check the reporting exclusion box for the stocks reported on a T-slip.

The Tax to English Version

 

So what does this all mean in English? Say you own 25 foreign stocks held at a Canadian brokerage that have a total cost of $150,000, but five of those stocks do not pay dividends or fail to pay a dividend in that year. As we now understand the CRA’s position, even though the 20 dividend paying stocks do not need to be individually listed, the 5 non-dividend paying stocks must be reported. Thus, you will need to tick the box on the T1135 Form to claim the exclusion for the 20 stocks, but you will also have to determine the highest cost amount of each of the five non-excluded stocks during the year (troublesome if you bought and sold) and the cost amount at the end of the year in addition to providing other information such as country location and capital gain or loss.

In the example above, if all 25 stocks pay dividends that will be reported on a T3 or T5, you will still have to file the T1135 and check the exclusion box; however, you do not need to report all the details of each individual stock. Clear as mud.

For people with only a few foreign holdings, this is not much of an issue. However, I have clients who are in private client programs with the large Canadian financial institutions that own 20-50 shares of multiple foreign stocks or have private managers running their money who have upwards of 50 U.S. and foreign stock/bond holdings. This means that the client, the advisor, or their accountant, or probably a combination of all three must review all these stocks to determine which ones are exempt from reporting because they paid a dividend or interest that was reported on a T3 or T5 from those that did not have any income reported on a T3 or T5.

My tax manager said the CRA representative he spoke with, gave him the impression that the CRA’s position has not gone over very well. Let’s hope the CRA simplifies life for many Canadians and just exempts any foreign security held at any Canadian Institution whether income is reported on a T-slip or not.

 

This article is posted on The Blunt Bean Counter website.  It provides information of a general nature and should not be considered specific advice, as each reader’s personal financial situation is unique and fact specific. Please contact a professional advisor prior to implementing or acting upon any of the information contained in one of the article.

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